Somersby_550Glynne James is a Lincolnshire artist who moved to Boston six years ago from Sleaford where he and his family lived for 35 years. He was born and raised in Hertfordshire where he started painting and exhibiting his work, but moved to Lincolnshire in 1974 and fell in love with the fens. He stared to develop his own unique style depicting the ever-changing and fascinating fenland landscape.

GJames_PolytheneLakesInASeaOfYellow_550The temporal approach is the essence of Glynne’s work and results in highly stylised canvases. Each painting approaches the landscape in terms of its changes, not as individual paintings but upon the same canvas, strips of fenland character displayed as a coherent whole. On occasions the adjacent strips are subtly differentiated as if moving from one minute’s observation to the next; on others the changes are sudden and startling – a field of wheat becomes a sea of plastic; a distant shape becomes a blazingly lit power station. Landscape which may appear featureless to the casual observer is presented with its components highlighted. It is evident that the twenty-first century is upon us, be it in the growing of new crops, the threat of climate change or the understated march of machinery. These paintings wake us from our dreamy preconception of what landscape painting is, and challenge the viewer to see the Fenland Landscape and not just look at it.

GJames_Memories_550Glynne is a regular exhibitor at Carre Gallery.  His work can also be seen at Store Street Gallery Bloomsbury London, Stark Gallery Canterbury, Buckenham Galleries Southwold Suffolk, Gallery in the Lanes Norwich, Riverside Art and Glass Wroxham Norfolk, Harding House Gallery Lincoln, Fulbeck Craft Centre and Arts Coritani Swineshead.

The exhibition is open 10 am – 4 pm every day (closed Sunday) until Saturday 02 September.

GJames_ASplendidYear_500

Images:  (From the top) Somersby Room at the gallery: Polythene Lakes in a Sea of Yellow: Memories: A Splendid Year.  Artwork photographed at the gallery by Martin Cameron. Click on any image to see a larger version (opens in new window/tab).

Glynne James

August 22, 2016

GJames_TheWhiteKnights_550Glynne James is a Lincolnshire artist who has recently moved to Boston from Sleaford where he and his family lived for 35 years. Glynne was born and raised in Hertfordshire where he started painting and exhibiting his work, but moved to Lincolnshire in 1974 and fell in love with the fens. He stared to develop his own unique style depicting the ever-changing and fascinating fenland landscape.

GJames_TheBiggestHouseInTheFens_550The temporal approach is the essence of Glynne’s work and results in highly stylised canvases. Each painting approaches the landscape in terms of its changes, not as individual paintings but upon the same canvas, strips of fenland character displayed as a coherent whole. On occasions the adjacent strips are subtly differentiated as if moving from one minute’s observation to the next; on others the changes are sudden and startling – a field of wheat becomes a sea of plastic; a distant shape becomes a blazingly lit power station. Landscape which may appear featureless to the casual observer is presented with its components highlighted. It is evident that the twenty-first century is upon us, be it in the growing of new crops, the threat of climate change or the understated march of machinery. These paintings wake us from our dreamy preconception of what landscape painting is, and challenge the viewer to see the Fenland Landscape and not just look at it.

Glynne’s recent exhibitions have been at Store Street Gallery in Bloomsbury, London, The Affordable Arts Fair at Battersea Park, London and Stockholm, Sweden. Glynne is also a Gallery Artist at Arts Coritani in Swineshead, Lincolnshire, Stark Gallery in Canterbury and has work regularly on show at Buckenham Galleries in Southwold, Suffolk.

Exhibition open 10 am – 4 pm every day except Sunday until 03 September 2016.

GJames_IndianSummer_550Images from top: The White Knights, The Biggest House in the Fens, Indian Summer photographed at the gallery by Martin Cameron.  Click on any image to see a larger version (opens in new window).

The Highlights of Dungeness

The Highlights of Dungeness

Glynne James was born and raised in Hertfordshire where he started painting and exhibiting his work. In 1974 he moved to Lincolnshire and fell in love with the Fens. Here he developed his own unique style depicting the ever-changing and fascinating fenland landscape.

Colan Campbell, artist and proprietor of Arts Coritani on Glynne’s paintings :-

GJames_Candlesby_450“The temporal approach is the essence of Glynne’s work and results in highly stylised canvases; each painting approaches the landscape in terms of its changes, not as individual paintings but upon the same canvas; strips of fenland character displayed as a coherent whole. On occasions the adjacent strips are subtly differentiated, as if moving from one minute’s observation to the next, on others the changes are sudden and startling; a field of wheat becomes a sea of plastic, a distant shape becomes a blazingly lit power station. Landscape which may appear featureless to the casual observer is presented with its components highlighted.

Glynne James with "Venetian Red"

Glynne James with “Venetian Red”

These then are not landscapes in the comfortable Constable sense. They still address the age-old relationship between artist and farmer but it is evident that the twenty-first century is upon us, be it in the growing of new crops, the threat of climate change or the understated march of machinery. These paintings wake us from our dreamy preconception of what landscape painting is, and challenge the viewer to see the Fenland Landscape; not just to look at it.”

Glynne regularly has work shown at Bell Fine Arts, Winchester, Store Street Gallery, Bloomsbury, London, Stark Gallery, Canterbury; Arts Coritani, Swineshead, Lincolnshire and Buckenham Galleries, Southwold, Suffolk. Glynne’s work has been exhibited by Stark Gallery and Bell Fine Art at Affordable Arts Fairs in Hampstead Heath and Battersea Park, London with successful outcomes. Glynne also holds an annual exhibition at Carre Gallery, Sleaford, Lincolnshire.

The exhibition is open 10 am – 4 pm from 24 November until 06 December. The gallery will be open every day including Sunday.

 Glynne will be in the gallery on the following dates:

November: Mon 24, Thu 27, Fri 28, Sat 29, Sun 30.  December: Mon 01, Fri 05, Sat 06.

www.glynnejamesart.com

Glynne James Exhibition at Carre Gallery Sleaford Lincolnshire November 2014.

Photography by © Martin Cameron.  Click on any image to see a larger version.
Rosi Campbell, Glynne James and guests

Rosi Campbell, Glynne James and guests

Carre Gallery welcomes Rosi Campbell and Glynne James, both resident artists at the Arts Coritani gallery in Swineshead.  Glynne is a regular solo exhibitor at Carre Gallery while Rosi is no stranger, having judged the Carre Gallery Summer show in 2010, as well as exhibiting in group shows.

Rosi Campbell

Window on the West by Rosi Campbell

Window on the West by Rosi Campbell

Rosi Campbell’s paintings have a special quality; people like them as soon as they see them. This endearing quality is uncontrived and has always typified her work since the early years of art college and overseas travel. It is a natural quality born of a positive view of the world around her, an expression of delight in colour, form and characteristics which most of us would not be so well aware of if not interpreted for us by those able to do so; poets, writers, actors, musicians, sculptors, architects and painters. We recognise what she sees once our senses have been nudged.”

 “Rosi paints exclusively in acrylics- a fast drying medium which facilitates the rapid completion of a painting. There is nothing ‘ laboured ‘ or ‘ overworked ‘ here and a spirit of freshness and movement is retained throughout. Her palette is lively, devoid of blacks, and both colour and form are exploited for their own sake at the expense of any rigid observations of the subject material. Invention rules – and it’s that which is responsible for the paintings’ immediate appeal.” – Colan Campbell

 Glynne James

Say Goodbye to the Blues by Glynne James

Say Goodbye to the Blues by Glynne James

Glynne James is a Lincolnshire artist who has recently moved to Boston from Sleaford where he and his family lived for 35 years.  Glynne was born and raised in Hertfordshire where he started painting and exhibiting his work but moved to Lincolnshire in 1974 and fell in love with the Fens.  He started to develop his own unique style depicting the ever-changing and fascinating fenland landscape.

The temporal approach is the essence of Glynne’s work and results in highly stylised canvases, each painting approaches the landscape in terms of its changes, not as individual paintings but upon the same canvas, strips of fenland character displayed as a coherent whole. On occasions the adjacent strips are subtly differentiated, as if moving from one minute’s observation to the next; on others the changes are sudden and startling – a field of wheat becomes a sea of plastic, a distant shape becomes a blazingly lit power station. Landscape which may appear featureless to the casual observer is presented with its components highlighted.

“These then are not landscapes in the comfortable Constable sense. They still address the age-old relationship between artist and farmer but it is evident that the 21st century is upon us, be it in the growing of new crops, the threat of climate change or the understated march of machinery. These paintings wake us from our dreamy preconception of what landscape painting is, and challenge the viewer to see the Fenland Landscape and not just look at it.”

Glynne’s recent exhibitions have been at Store Street Gallery, Bloomsbury, London and The Affordable Arts Fair at Hampstead Heath.   Glynne is also a Gallery Artist at Arts Coritani, Swineshead, Lincolnshire, Stark Gallery, Canterbury and has work regularly on show at Buckenham Galleries, Southwold, Suffolk.  Recent works have gone to America, Japan, Vietnam and the Netherlands.

The exhibition is open from 10 am – 4 pm every day from 19 August until 31 August 2013.

Meet the Artists:  Glynne will be at the gallery on Tuesday 20th, all over the bank holiday weekend, Thursday 29th and Saturday 30th;  Rosi will be at the gallery on Friday 23 August. Both would love to see lots of visitors and are happy to chat. On all the other days the exhibition will be manned by volunteers of the Carre Gallery for whom Rosi and Glynne are very grateful.

Bright Horizon (left) by Glynne James and Lady of the Blue Trees by Rosi Campbell

Bright Horizon (left) by Glynne James and Lady of the Blue Trees by Rosi Campbell

Long Summer Day

Glynne was born and raised in Hertfordshire where he started painting and exhibiting his work. He moved to Lincolnshire in 1974 with his wife Carol and over the next 20 years he started to develop his own unique style, depicting the ever-changing and fascinating fenland landscape.

Glynne James at Carre Gallery

The temporal approach is the essence of Glynne’s work and results in highly stylised canvases. Each painting approaches the landscape in terms of its changes, not as individual paintings but upon the same canvas, strips of fenland character displayed as a coherent whole. On occasions the adjacent strips are subtly differentiated as if moving from one minute’s observation to the next. On others, the changes are sudden and startling; a field of wheat becomes a sea of plastic, a distant shape becomes a blazingly lit power station. Landscape which may appear featureless to the casual observer is presented with its components highlighted.

Say Goodbye to the Blues

These then are not landscapes in the comfortable Constable sense. They still address the age-old relationship between artist and farmer but it is evident that the 21st century is upon us, be it in the growing of new crops, the threat of climate change or the understated march of machinery. These paintings wake us from our dreamy preconception of what landscape painting is and challenge the viewer to see the Fenland Landscape and not just look at it.

Glynne’s exhibition is open 10 am ’til 4 pm until Sat 01 September.

Glynne James at Carre Gallery

Art by Glynne James

A welcome return to Carre Gallery of this popular artist who paints Lincolnshire Landscapes in a distinctive style.  Glynne James exhibits extensively and his work is in private collections in the UK, Japan, The Netherlands and America.

Sunset over Polythene Fields by Glynne James

“My paintings are about time and space within the landscape, vast skies and huge tracts of farmland that can change in a matter of minutes or over a lifetime.”

“I try to paint the progression of the landscape from when a seed is sown to when the crop is grown; a new buiding, a gentle breeze or a summer storm, all have an influence on how we look at the landscape and what we feel.”

“When people say the fens are empty, that is because they have not really looked. A telephone pole, a solitary tree or the new wind turbines and power stations all have a place in our time; all should be seen.”

“My work is about the contrasts in nature, I try to portray the landscape in all its moods at different times of day and year.”

The exhibition is open every day 10 am – 4 pm from Mon 29 August until Sat 03 September 2011.

A selection of paintings by Glynne James in the Carre Gallery until 05 September.

Memories - © Glynne James

When people say the fens are empty, that is because they have not looked.  A telephone pole, a solitary tree, or the new wind turbines all have a place, all should be seen.

I try to paint the progression of the landscape from when a seed is sown to when a crop is grown, a new building, a gentle breeze or a summer storm; all have an influence on how we look at the landscape and what we feel.

My work is about contrasts in the landscape in the form of colour, beauty, weather conditions, the old and the new.  The new may not be to your liking but it may make you appreciate the old.  Everyone has their own likes and dislikes.  Most people like seeing poppies in the field, but does the farmer?

I try and portray the fens in all its moods and times and hope that by taking them to pieces and putting them back together again, people will look more closely and see the fens as I do.

Glynne James